New recipes

3-Ingredient Blueberry Freezer Jam

3-Ingredient Blueberry Freezer Jam


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

With this recipe you can enjoy that sweet taste of Maine wild blueberries all year long and rekindle wonderful travel memories

When we are off on an adventure, we love to indulge in the local flavors, and our next adventure will be to Maine. To top it off, July is actually National Blueberry Month!

Picking and shopping for fresh wild blueberries in their little cardboard containers will be one of the highlights of our trip. And not only will we enjoy them while in Maine, but we’ll bring a whole slew of blueberries home to eat, freeze, and make jam with. In the spirit of the season, we’d like to share this small batch freezer jam recipe because it's an simple and tasty way to savor your travels even after returning home.

Notes

You’ll need a non-reactive pot and 6 half-pint Mason Jars for canning, with lids.

Ingredients

  • 12 Cups blueberries (about 4 pounds)
  • 2 1/2 Cups honey (add 2 tablespoons of water if using raw honey)
  • Juice from 1 lemon (about 2 tablespoons)

Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.


Fruit. Use perfectly ripe fruit. Since you won&apost be cooking it, the flavor of the jam is going to be much like the flavor of the fruit. If it&aposs over- or underripe, you&aposll be able to taste it. Jam made with underripe fruit, besides being sour, might jell too much, while jam made with overripe fruit might not jell enough.

Sugar. Sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria, keeping your jam fresh, fruity, and safe to eat. Jam recipes are formulated to call for a certain ratio of pectin to sugar, and they will not jell properly if you don&apost use the correct amount of sugar. If you&aposd like to make less-sweet jam, you&aposll need to buy a special kind of pectin that&aposs formulated to work with less sugar.

Pectin. Most recipes call for additional pectin to thicken the jam, giving it that familiar jammy consistency. Commercially produced pectin is derived from fruit usually apples or citrus. Store-bought pectin comes in two forms: powder and liquid. Most recipes call for powdered pectin, but these are not interchangeable — use whichever form your recipe calls for.

The basic ratios for each packet of powdered pectin are:

  • 3 cups mashed fruit
  • 5 cups sugar, and
  • 1 cup water in which to dissolve and boil the pectin.

This formula can vary a little depending on the brand of pectin, so follow the instructions on the package.



Comments:

  1. Mojinn

    And you so tried?

  2. Dieter

    I think I make mistakes. I propose to discuss it. Write to me in PM, it talks to you.



Write a message