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Best Kohlrabi Recipes

Best Kohlrabi Recipes

Kohlrabi Shopping Tips

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Kohlrabi Cooking Tips

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.


  • 3 pounds kohlrabi (6-7 medium), peeled and cut into 1/8-inch slices
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 large leek, sliced
  • 1 ⅓ cups low-fat milk, divided
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground pepper
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 cup shredded Gruyère cheese
  • ⅓ cup fresh whole-wheat breadcrumbs, toasted

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Put a large pot of water on to boil. Coat an 8-inch-square baking dish with cooking spray.

Cook kohlrabi in the boiling water until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add leek and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened but not browned, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Heat 1 cup milk in a small saucepan over medium heat until steaming. Whisk flour and the remaining 1/3 cup milk in a small bowl to make a smooth paste stir into the hot milk and cook, whisking constantly, until the sauce thickens, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in salt, pepper and nutmeg.

Arrange 1/3 of the kohlrabi in the prepared pan. Top with half the leek and 1/3 cup each cream sauce and cheese. Repeat with another layer of kohlrabi, the remaining leek and 1/3 cup each cream sauce and cheese. Top with the remaining kohlrabi and sauce. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/3 cup cheese and breadcrumbs.

Bake until bubbling and golden on top, 25 to 30 minutes. Let cool for 5 minutes before serving.

To make ahead: Prepare through Step 5 cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day.


How to Use and Cook Kohlrabi

  • Roast it – As I mentioned above, if you’ve never worked with this interesting vegetable, I think this Roasted Kohlrabi recipe is the place to start. The result of this super easy recipe is a very, naturally sweet treat.
  • Purée it – It’s delicious in soups and sauces.
  • Sauté it – this will have a similar result to roasting, as it will caramelize nicely bringing all of the natural sugars to the surface.
  • Eat it raw – It’s wonderful in slaws, salads, or as a vehicle for delicious dips!
  • Spiralize it – A pretty way to serve it raw or cooked.

Kohlrabi recipes can also be made with the greens of the vegetable — they’re fantastic in a stir-fry, and you can use the stems in stocks and broths.


Roasted Kohlrabi Recipes

Hello, welcome to our recipe blog site. Here you can get a guide on how to make extremely yummy Roasted Kohlrabi recipes. The manufacturing procedure is extremely simple, you just require to follow the techniques that we have actually composed on this page. The complying with are the phases of how to cook Roasted Kohlrabi. Please adhere to the instructions well.
Easy. Simple. Healthful. And tastes good! In short, Roasted Kohlrabi is a win-win-win recipe. It’s low carb. Weight Watchers Friendly. Not just vegan, Vegan Done Real. Naturally Gluten Free. Whole30 Friendly. And delicious!

1 1/2 pounds (675g) fresh kohlrabi, ends trimmed, thick green skin sliced off with a knife, then diced
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic, optional
Salt
Good vinegar

Thank you for visiting our blog site. Hopefully the guidelines for making Roasted Kohlrabi dishes over can be valuable for you. As well as don’t forget to share this recipe by clicking the PIN button below, as well as share it with all your friends.tn

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I have been a health insurance broker for over a decade and every day I read more and more “horror” stories that are posted on the Internet regarding health insurance companies not paying claims, refusing to cover specific illnesses and physicians not getting reimbursed for medical services. Unfortunately, insurance companies are driven by profits, not people (albeit they need people to make profits). If the insurance company can find a legal reason not to pay a claim, chances are they will find it, and you the consumer will suffer. However, what most people fail to realize is that there are very few “loopholes” in an insurance policy that give the insurance company an unfair advantage over the consumer. In fact, insurance companies go to great lengths to detail the limitations of their coverage by giving the policy holders 10-days (a 10-day free look period) to review their policy. Unfortunately, most people put their insurance cards in their wallet and place their policy in a drawer or filing cabinet during their 10-day free look and it usually isn’t until they receive a “denial” letter from the insurance company that they take their policy out to really read through it. The majority of people, who buy their own health insurance, rely heavily on the insurance agent selling the policy to explain the plan’s coverage and benefits. Don’t you think it would be better to put that extra $200 ($2,400 per year) in your bank account, just in case you may have to pay your $2,500 deductible or buy a $12 Amoxicillin prescription? Isn’t it wiser to keep your hard-earned money rather than pay higher premiums to an insurance company?


How to Cook Kohlrabi

This versatile vegetable can be roasted, steamed, stir-fried, or puréed in a soup. For a simple side dish, sauté the sliced kohlrabi in a bit of butter in a skillet. Once it begins to show some caramelization, season it with salt, nutmeg, and a little sugar​ for increased sweetness. Continue cooking until slightly al dente, with a bit of crispness, and serve it immediately.


Choosing Kohlrabi

When you buy the kohlrabi, choose small young ones. These will have the best flavor. Kohlrabi belongs to the cabbage family and it's flavor can be quite intense.

You can choose either the green or the purple variety. Both can be eaten raw. Peeled and sliced, kohlrabi makes a great addition to a salad tray that has people coming back for more and not knowing what they are eating - they only know it tastes great, similar to broccoli stems.

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Roasted Kohlrabi: German Turnips

Kohlrabi, also known as German turnip, is a vegetable from the same family as broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage. Edible in its entirety, it has leaves that are great in salads, soups, and stews, while the bulbs can be eaten cooked or raw. Kohlrabi has a mild taste and is a beautiful addition to your table when in season. Sweet, with a peppery hint, kohlrabi reminds one a little of the stems of other cruciferous vegetables. It's great sauteed, roasted, or thinly sliced in a slaw-style salad.

Many cooks are unfamiliar with this vegetable, but kohlrabi is becoming more easily available in supermarkets. If you have the chance to find it at your farmer's market, don't miss out. Always pick kohlrabi that still has its leaves on, and with firm bulbs. Also, go for smaller bulbs, as these tend to be sweeter. Cooking with it is easy and it makes a great side dish for any protein, such as chicken, pork, or white fish. Or make it the star of the show in vegetarian preparations like risottos, pasta dishes, or delicious grain bowls.

This flavorful vegetable will be a delightful discovery, as the tender caramelized sweetness in our preparation is simply delicious. It's beautiful on its own, but some fresh herbs or a drizzle of balsamic vinegar will bring out even more of its natural flavor. A sprinkle of Parmesan cheese is also a delicious finish to this dish.


Kohlrabi-Topped Shepherd's Pie

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Kohlrabi, a member of the turnip family, is rich in potassium and vitamin C. Its earthy, slightly sweet flavor makes it a great substitute for potatoes in dishes like potato salad. For this shepherd’s pie, roasting the kohlrabi adds extra flavor and dries the vegetable out to ensure a creamy, not watery, topping. As it’s roasting, the ground lamb is simmered with vegetables, thyme, tomato paste, wine, and beef broth until it’s a thick, saucy filling. The roasted kohlrabi is then puréed and spread on top of the filling, before the whole dish is baked until bubbly and browned.

Game plan: The filling can be made up to 1 day ahead, cooled to room temperature, and refrigerated in an airtight container. Reheat the filling before proceeding with the recipe.


Creamy Kohlrabi Soup with Potatoes &ndash German Kohlrabi Recipe

A perfectly creamy and delicious German kohlrabi soup recipe with potatoes and cream cheese.

Ingredients

  • 700 g/ 1.5 lbs kohlrabi (about 2-3 depending on size)
  • 500 g/ 1.1 lbs potatoes (floury or all-purpose potatoes)
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 750 ml/ 25.3 fl.oz/ 3 ¼ cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 3 heaped tablespoons cream cheese (Philadelphia style)
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (more or less to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • a few gratings of nutmeg
  • fine sea salt and ground black pepper
  • small bunch of parsley
  • a pinch of red chili flakes, optional
  • a pinch of nigella seeds, optional

Instructions

Remove the stems and the leaves of the kohlrabi. Keep the leaves separated as they will be only added to the soup towards the end of the cooking process.

Place the kohlrabi bulb on a cutting board and slice off the top and bottom, removing the small woody part at the bottom of the kolhrabi bulb as well. Peel the skin with a knife or vegetable peeler the way you would peel an apple. Discard the skin. Cut the kohlrabi bulb and the stems into cubes.

Peel and cube the potatoes as well. Finely chop the onion.

Heat the oil in a soup pan and cook the onion for about 2-3 minutes or until translucent. Add the cubed vegetables and cook for about another 4 minutes, stirring a few times in between.

Add the vegetable or chicken stock, bring to a boil, turn down the heat and simmer the kohlrabi soup for about 20 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Add the chopped kohlrabi leaves during the last 5 minutes of the cooking time.

Add the cream cheese to the soup and blend the soup with an immersion blender. Reheat the soup gently without bringing it to a boil again.

Add salt, pepper, sugar, nutmeg and one tablespoon of the lemon juice. Taste again and adjust the taste with more lemon juice and more of the spices.

Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and maybe some red chili flakes and nigella seeds.

Nutrition Information:

Nutritional information is not always accurate.

Thursday 29th of October 2020

Hi! This recipe sounds lovely and I am just about to try it out. Cam I substitute cream cheese for something else or omit it? Would the consistency change a lot? Thank you.

Thursday 29th of October 2020

Hi Rossella. You could substitute it with heavy cream. If you leave out the dairy, the recipe will change completely. It will still be ok, but different.

Adina, can you believe I've never had kohlrabi? I've seen it in the store but never knew what to do with it. This soup looks delicious. I have to finally try it!

Wednesday 8th of May 2019

We love Kohlrabi both raw in a salad or cooked in various dishes. Oh, BTW, no problem finding it here in Sweden, it's quite famous. With that said, I've not tried a kohlrabi and potato soup such as this, but I will soon. It sounds wonderful. What a great idea to add that pinch of nigella seeds.

The soup looks delicious. I haven't had turnip soup before, it does sound lovely though.

Kathy @ Beyond the Chicken Coop

My husband tried to grow kohlrabi one summer. We didn't have much luck. We did harvest a few small plants and sliced them up and ate them raw. I really didn't even know what to do with them. This soup looks like a perfect recipe! It looks perfectly creamy and delicious.

ABOUT ME

Hello! Where Is My Spoon is a blog where you will find delicious and family friendly recipes, all made from scratch. From simple healthy soups to sumptuous cakes for special occasions, all our recipes have been tried and loved by our family and our friends.


Just like kohlrabi stem or bulb, kohlrabi leaves are highly nutritious.

Most people did not realize their benefits and just throw them away or feed them to animals. This is a huge mistake.

According to Dr. Paul Haider , a master herbalist, kohlrabi greens or leaves are a great superfood and people should not take them for granted.

Kohlrabi leaves are low in calories and fats and are cholesterol-free so they make great weight-loss food .

Kohlrabi leaves also have plenty of vitamins A, B, C, and K, as well as beta carotene, antioxidants, chlorophyll, and trace minerals.

Some of the important trace minerals that kohlrabi leaves have include:

  • Copper and iron which are great minerals for anemia
  • Potassium that helps regulate our blood pressure and heart contraction
  • Magnesium that plays a great role in our body’s immune system
  • Zinc that is needed for immune function and proper growth and maintenance

Recipe Summary

  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
  • 3/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon celery seeds
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 pounds purple and/or green kohlrabi, peeled and coarsely shredded on a box grater
  • 1 cup shredded green cabbage
  • 1 medium celery rib, thinly sliced crosswise

In a large bowl, whisk the mayonnaise with the canola oil, vinegar, mustard, sugar, celery seeds, 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt and 3/4 teaspoon of pepper. Add the kohlrabi, cabbage and celery and toss well. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Season the slaw with salt and pepper and serve.