New recipes

Top 8 2010 Burgundies

Top 8 2010 Burgundies


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Pinot noirs delivering Burgundy's finest terroir expression

2010 burgundies are hitting the shelves, or in some cases due to the marriage of limited quantities and high ratings, are slipping through the retail channels without ever having seen a shelf. Yes, this is the perfect storm: a great vintage, lower than average yields, and a newly found appreciation of burgundy in emerging markets, making value in burgundy more relative than ever.

Still, this is a smashingly good vintage, and there are wines that punch way above their pay grade even today, though I expect these real values will be going the way of the dodo before long. Burgundy has never been cheap of course, but you can still find exceptional, age-worthy examples for less than $40 a bottle, making them top values in my book. Here are eight examples from a recent blind tasting. Does paying more always make sense? I don’t think so.

These wines were tasted in two flights of four with the scoring reflecting our results for each flight.

Click here to find the best 2010 burgundies.

— Gregory Del Piaz, Snooth


How to Boil Chicken

Many recipes call for "cooked chicken" in the ingredient list, whether that&aposs cubed, sliced, or shredded. Although using a rotisserie chicken is a good way to add cooked chicken to any meal, if you have some extra raw chicken on hand you can easily boil it and add it to a variety of dishes.

You can even boil chicken ahead of time and store it to use throughout the week. It&aposs perfect for adding to salads, soups, quesadillas, and so much more. Save yourself a trip to the store and learn how to boil chicken in a few simple steps.


Recipe Summary

  • 4 bone-in short ribs (2 inches thick, 2 pounds total)
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8 ounces white button mushrooms, quartered
  • 3 carrots, 2 finely chopped and 1 cut into 3/4-inch cubes
  • 3 shallots, minced
  • 2 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 2 strips bacon, thinly sliced crosswise
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 thyme sprigs
  • 1 dried bay leaf
  • 1 cup dry red wine, such as Burgundy
  • 8 cups homemade or store-bought low-sodium beef stock
  • 2 cups water
  • Herbed Egg Noodles, for serving
  • Horseradish Chive Bread, for serving

Season ribs with 1/2 teaspoon salt andsome pepper. Coat with cornstarch. Heat oilin a large heavy pot (preferably enameledcast iron) over medium-high heat. Lightlybrown ribs on all sides, about 6 minutes.Transfer to a plate.

Add mushrooms to pot. Cook untilbrowned, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowladd cubed carrot.

Add shallots, celery, bacon, and choppedcarrots to pot. Cook until caramelized, about6 minutes. Stir in tomato paste.

Return ribs with plate juices to pot. Addthyme and bay leaf. Raise heat to high.Add wine. Cook, scraping up brown bits witha wooden spoon, until slightly reduced,about 1 minute. Add stock and water. Bring toa boil. Reduce heat, and simmer, partiallycovered, until beef is tender, 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Remove ribs. Separate meat from bonesdiscard. Cut meat into bite-size pieces returnto pot. Add reserved mushroom-carrotmixture. Bring to a simmer cook untilcubed carrots are tender. Season with salt. Ladle soup over bowls of herbed egg noodles and serve with horseradish chive bread on the side.


Wine Berserkers - international wine social media, online community, and discussion

My favorite GC white for the $ is Jadot Corton Charlemagne.

For 1er, I agree with Bouchard and would add Clos des Mouches Blanc from Drouhin. Niellon 1er whites still offer value. I do enjoy Labet Beaune Marconnets too.

Curious to hear more options.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#3 Post by B. Buzzini » May 9th, 2020, 7:58 pm

Walter Scott. someone had to say it! 18 Anne Cuvée n glass.

Good list. Louis Michel Chablis as well.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#4 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 9th, 2020, 8:06 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#5 Post by Ron Erickson » May 9th, 2020, 8:16 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#6 Post by Sean S y d n e y » May 9th, 2020, 8:17 pm

Drouhin's Montagny that I had a few weeks ago was absolutely wonderful and about $25 USD, if that's not too proletariat.

edit: I see I was beaten just above

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#7 Post by Kris Patten » May 9th, 2020, 8:44 pm

Sean S y d n e y wrote: ↑ May 9th, 2020, 8:17 pm Drouhin's Montagny that I had a few weeks ago was absolutely wonderful and about $25 USD, if that's not too proletariat.

edit: I see I was beaten just above

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#8 Post by Paul Seah » May 9th, 2020, 10:05 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#9 Post by Ian S » May 9th, 2020, 10:14 pm

Alan Eden - the "Crazy Uncle" Berserker and Master Pot Stirrer forever!

"I swear to god, I've never seen so many whiny bitches in one place in my life." - Steve Saxon, 01/30/18
"Moral superiority can taste awfully good to some." - David Kantrowitz, 05/29/19

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#10 Post by dcornutt » May 10th, 2020, 2:36 am

" Care about what other people think and you will always be their prisoner." - LAO TZU

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#11 Post by jason stein » May 10th, 2020, 4:29 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#12 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 5:06 am

Let us start with the Moreaus:

Bernard Moreau Bourgogne Blanc (paid $25 for the 2017), Chassagne-Montrachet and St. Aubin En Remilly
Christian Moreau - premier cru Chablis
Moreau Naudet - premier cru Chablis

Bouchard Meursault Perrieres
Heitz-Lochardet Meursault En la Barre and Meursault Les Gruyaches
Domaine des Moirots - I like his reds better than his whites, but his whites are not bad
Whites from Aubert de Villaine

I have seen some good prices lately on Jadot whites. If premox there really is cured by DIAM, then I would put these as excellent values.

I really like Drouhin's whites, but prices have gone up a good bit over the last couple of years. Can sometimes be good values.

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#13 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 5:09 am

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#14 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 5:26 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#15 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 5:49 am

The last email I got for their wines was from Chambers Street:

Click to view up-to-date inventory on our website →
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
| 12 in stock | $42.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
| 36 in stock | $32.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
| 36 in stock | $63.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
| 7 in stock | $89.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
| 24 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
| 18 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
| 9 in stock | $89.99

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#16 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 5:55 am

Howard Cooper wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 5:49 am The last email I got for their wines was from Chambers Street:

Click to view up-to-date inventory on our website →
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
| 12 in stock | $42.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
| 36 in stock | $32.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
| 36 in stock | $63.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
| 7 in stock | $89.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
| 24 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
| 18 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
| 9 in stock | $89.99

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#17 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 10th, 2020, 5:56 am

Obligatory post in each thread on this topic

I have a couple 2018 X-Novos on their way to me. How's the Anne Cuvee?

CT and IG: rieslinghoarder

2021 WOTY Candidates:
2019 Hofgut Falkenstein Niedermenniger Herrenberg Riesling Spätlese feinherb “Meyer Nepal” #11
2015 Kelley Fox Wines Pinot Noir Maresh Vineyard Red Barn Blocks
1997 Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Scharzhofberger Riesling Auslese
2019 Emrich-Schönleber Halenberg Riesling Grosses Gewächs

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#18 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 7:58 am

B. Buzzini wrote: ↑ May 9th, 2020, 7:58 pm Walter Scott. someone had to say it! 18 Anne Cuvée n glass.

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#19 Post by R. Frankel » May 10th, 2020, 8:16 am

I too really liked the ‘17 PYCM BB. Bought a half case, wanted to see how they aged. Oops, drank them up!

Some more value white Burgs I would add
- Moreau Nadeau - lovely Chablis up and down the range
- Henri Prudhon - mostly St. Aubin and extremely impressive.
- Droin Chablis - also scratches that itch nicely
- Saumaize-Michelin Pouilly-Fuisse - richer wines but also well made.

Sure I’m buying some higher end things - Bernard Moreau, Henri Boillot, a little bit of others but those are less good ‘value’ options I think. I was really impressed by Lamy-Pillot at the 2019 La Paulee but have yet to find them on the west coast at prices I liked.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#20 Post by Rick Allen » May 10th, 2020, 9:30 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#21 Post by Josh Grossman » May 10th, 2020, 10:05 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#22 Post by Chris Seiber » May 10th, 2020, 10:26 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#23 Post by Chris Seiber » May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am

PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#24 Post by Yao C » May 10th, 2020, 10:36 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#25 Post by Yao C » May 10th, 2020, 10:42 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#26 Post by alan weinberg » May 10th, 2020, 10:45 am

there are some occasional opportunities to find PYCM at lesser prices, also Boillot. I paid 95 for 18 Moucheres. I paid 85 for 17 PYCM Ancegnieres. I think those are great values, wines playing above their appellation. I titled the thread best value, not cheapest.

Almost put some of the Moreau on the list.

I had Michel on there, Buzz.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#27 Post by Josh Grossman » May 10th, 2020, 10:59 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#28 Post by ykwon » May 10th, 2020, 12:34 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#29 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 12:41 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#30 Post by JLee » May 10th, 2020, 12:49 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#31 Post by jason stein » May 10th, 2020, 12:51 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#32 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 1:00 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#33 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 1:02 pm

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#34 Post by JLee » May 10th, 2020, 1:06 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#35 Post by Chris Seiber » May 10th, 2020, 1:13 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

If that is all it is, then wouldn't all other White Burgundies have an equivalent pricing spike from the 17 to 18 vintages? And if the tariffs go back down, PYCM pricing will return to a year or two ago?

Again, PYCM makes great wines, and additionally is very much in vogue with buyers, so I'm not surprised or upset that the prices are spiking up. Same way I feel when that happens with a new world wine. But every time a hot Burg or Northern Rhone or Piedmont producer has its price skyrocket, we all have to pretend that it's only because of some shadowy middlemen, tariffs, grey market, or something else at play rather than regular supply and demand. When it's a new world wine, then it's all about greed, score whores, and so forth. It feels like it's more about people confirming their biases about good guys and bad guys than it is an accurate statement about what is going on.

Maybe I'm wrong - I certainly have been before. Explain it to me and I'll listen with an open mind.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#36 Post by Craig G » May 10th, 2020, 1:26 pm

My current best values are the Domaine Renaud Macons (Charnay and Solutré) from K&L. They’re unusually good for $20. There are a bunch of other white Burgs in that range but most of those I’ve tried have been disappointing.

The Bize BB Perrières is really good too. It’s more like $35 or $40.

“You need to look down to the bottom shelf where they keep the Fighting Cock” — Corey N.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#37 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 1:32 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

If that is all it is, then wouldn't all other White Burgundies have an equivalent pricing spike from the 17 to 18 vintages? And if the tariffs go back down, PYCM pricing will return to a year or two ago?

Again, PYCM makes great wines, and additionally is very much in vogue with buyers, so I'm not surprised or upset that the prices are spiking up. Same way I feel when that happens with a new world wine. But every time a hot Burg or Northern Rhone or Piedmont producer has its price skyrocket, we all have to pretend that it's only because of some shadowy middlemen, tariffs, grey market, or something else at play rather than regular supply and demand. When it's a new world wine, then it's all about greed, score whores, and so forth. It feels like it's more about people confirming their biases about good guys and bad guys than it is an accurate statement about what is going on.

Maybe I'm wrong - I certainly have been before. Explain it to me and I'll listen with an open mind.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#38 Post by Rick Allen » May 10th, 2020, 1:38 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#39 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 1:42 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

If that is all it is, then wouldn't all other White Burgundies have an equivalent pricing spike from the 17 to 18 vintages? And if the tariffs go back down, PYCM pricing will return to a year or two ago?

Again, PYCM makes great wines, and additionally is very much in vogue with buyers, so I'm not surprised or upset that the prices are spiking up. Same way I feel when that happens with a new world wine. But every time a hot Burg or Northern Rhone or Piedmont producer has its price skyrocket, we all have to pretend that it's only because of some shadowy middlemen, tariffs, grey market, or something else at play rather than regular supply and demand. When it's a new world wine, then it's all about greed, score whores, and so forth. It feels like it's more about people confirming their biases about good guys and bad guys than it is an accurate statement about what is going on.

Maybe I'm wrong - I certainly have been before. Explain it to me and I'll listen with an open mind.


Little Burgundies From Big Negociants

Bargains in Burgundy? The négociants have stepped up quality, and the result is an increased number of well-made, affordable wines.

Burgundy and good value: the two seem like a contradiction in terms. With its patchwork vineyards producing tiny quantities of rare and expensive wines, surely France’s top region for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir can hardly be expected to come up with wines that fit into one’s everyday budget.

It’s certainly not easy to find good Burgundies that sell for under $20—or even under $25—per bottle. Any wine lover knows that buying Burgundy is like walking through a minefield. But it is possible to make the trip, and enjoy it too. The secret is to seek out the right combination of strong appellations and reputable producers.

After all, just the name of a wine is no guarantee. With as many as 80 producers able to produce wines with the same name from the same land—the famed Clos Vougeot is the best-known example—the quality of the winemaking becomes as important as the land itself. The profile of Burgundy’s producers ranges from large-scale, modern négociants to small farmers with as little as ten acres of vines, scattered over a number of different vineyards. Inevitably, standards vary, and vary enormously.

The heart of Burgundy, the classic villages of the Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune, actually accounts for only a small proportion of the total Burgundian vineyards (about 17 percent). Away from this central area known as the Côte d’Or, there are lesser-known villages and areas that can yield wines of good value and good quality.

Outlying regions, such as the Côte Chalonnaise and the Mâconnais, have benefited from the success of the top Côte d’Or wines. Investment and know-how have arrived in what were once rustic, out-of-the-way appellations. And while prices have gone up, they have certainly remained relatively modest compared with the big names along the Côte d’Or.

Beyond these areas, there are vineyards that produce good value wines that come under the simple generic appellations of Bourgogne rouge and Bourgogne blanc—red and white Burgundy.

The problem in these outer appellations—indeed in all of Burgundy—is the variation in quality. While there is a recognizable style of wine that comes from each of the different appellations, it is how that style is interpreted that becomes vital. There are plenty of producers, including some famous names, who still make wines with traditional barnyard flavors and aromas. Anthony Hanson, a British expert on Burgundy, once famously likened the smell of the region’s red wines to rotting leaves or manure, and it is a smell that, once registered, is never forgotten. It comes from dirty winemaking, but for many years it was thought to be the true taste of Burgundy, and there is still some sentimentality attached to it. The whites, too, were once flavored more with sulfur than with fruit.

Today, whatever their size, hygienic winemaking operations produce the best wines, with a focus on fruit. The character of Burgundy, at whatever price point, should emphasize the juiciness of the fruit and the natural acidity of the grapes. The best examples interweave earthy or mineral notes expressive of the regions from which they originate. Because of their financial resources, many of the large négociants have been able to clean up their acts and now produce impressive arrays of inexpensive wines. Certainly, at this price level, theirs are the wines most widely available in the United States.

Négociants in Burgundy purchase grapes, must, and bulk wine from a wide range of growers and vignerons, but many also own vineyards. Increasingly, age-old verbal agreements with private growers are being replaced by long-term leases that give the négociants greater control over vineyard management and harvest timing. With increased attention to cellar hygiene and greater control over the entire winemaking process, négociant red Burgundies have gone from the farmyardy, overchaptalized wines of the early 1980s to essentially clean, fresh, perfumed wines in the second half of the 1990s.

Some négociants have made this transition better than others. I’m thinking of Louis Jadot, Joseph Drouhin, Bouchard Père et Fils, Jaffelin and, above all, Faiveley, whose wines at all levels are among the very best in Burgundy today. Some have been there for a longer time: Georges Duboeuf (who has expanded upon his specialty of Beaujolais to include whites from southern Burgundy) and Chartron et Trébuchet (also specialists in white wines). Others, equally famous, seem to have fallen behind at one end of the spectrum while still making stellar wines at the high end. Louis Latour is the most prominent of these.

For less than $25 per bottle, these Burgundies compare favorably with many Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays from California and Oregon, though they taste quite different. Burgundy’s reds are more structured and tannic than the New World offerings, but underlying those tannins are the same silky, velvety fruit flavors that make Pinot Noir such a seductive wine. The whites, especially those that are fermented and aged in wood, are closer in style to the New World, although they never have the overwhelming butteriness and fatness, nor the high alcohol levels, of some California Chardonnays.

Here’s a rundown on the wines and their styles from some of the top value appellations of Burgundy, including a few producers—négociants and domaines—in each appellation whose wines are worth considering, even if some of the domaine wines are a little more expensive. These are wines for consumers who love the taste of fine Burgundy, but can’t always afford the price tags.

Auxey-Duresses
Fruity, sometimes elegant, reds and biscuity whites that develop quickly are the hallmarks of this village just south and west of Volnay in the Côte de Beaune.
Good producers: Domaine Robert Ampeau, Domaine Comte Armand, Domaine Leroy, Louis Jadot (Domaine du Duc de Magenta).

Bourgogne
As an alternative to the village appellations listed here, consider simple Bourgogne rouge and Bourgogne blanc. At this level, with their ability to select grapes and wine from all over Burgundy for blending, the négociants are producing some attractive wines at even better prices.
Good Bourgogne rouge producers: Bouchard Père et Fils, Joseph Drouhin, Faiveley, Jaffelin, Louis Jadot, Domaine Leroy.
Good Bourgogne blanc producers: Bouchard Père et Fils, Jean-Marc Brocard, Joseph Drouhin, Faiveley, Louis Jadot, Domaine Leroy.

Chorey-lès-Beaune
Lightweight wines coming from sandy soil on the plain east of Savigny-lès-Beaune. A few producers make some attractive wines.
Good producers: Château de Chorey-lès-Beaune, Joseph Drouhin, Domaine Tollot-Beaut et Fils.

Fixin
Right at the northern end of the Côte de Nuits. The reds (almost all the production is red) are somewhat tannic when young and can
be rustic.
Good producers: Domaine Bruno Clair, Louis Jadot, Domaine Mongeard-Mugneret, Domaine de la Perrière.

Givry
Fragrant, soft reds and smaller quantities of rich, nutty whites from the village whose wines were once known as the favorites of France’s Henri IV.
Good producers: Antonin Rodet (Domaine de la Ferté), Domaine Joblot, Domaine Gérard et Laurent Parize.

Hautes-Côtes-de-Beaune
The southern extension of the Hautes-Côtes-de-Nuits, producing wines in a similar light and fruity style, but at good prices.
Good producers: Domaine du Château de Mandelot, Domaine Michel Serveau.

Hautes-Côtes-de-Nuits
Red and white wines come from the hills and secluded valleys to the west of the Côte de Nuits. Soft and fruity, these wines mature earlier than their more famous counterparts.
Good producers: Domaine Bertagna, Domaine Guy Dufouleur, Domaine Michel Gros, Dominique Guyon.

Mercurey
Powerful reds come from the biggest appellation in the Côte Chalonnaise (which actually used to be known as the Région de Mercurey). The best producers are able to tame the power the worst just let it become clumsy.
Good producers: Antonin Rodet (Château de Chamirey), Bouchard Père et Fils, Chartron et Trébuchet (Clos Marcilly), Faiveley, Louis Max, Michel Juillot.

Montagny
An entirely white-wine appellation, producing some of the best-priced blancs of Burgundy. Fat and rich in style, they mature quickly.
Good producers: Bouchard Père et Fils, Cave des Vignerons de Buxy, Faiveley.

Monthélie
A close neighbor of Volnay, producing almost entirely red wines, with something of the same fragrance and perfume, but a shorter lifespan. When mature, they are smooth and velvety.
Good producers: Bouchard Père et Fils, Jaffelin, Olivier Leflaive.

Pouilly-Loché
The poor man’s Pouilly-Fuissé, with some of the fruit and fat of the more famous wine, but without the price tag.
Good producers: Cave des Vignerons de Buxy, Georges Duboeuf.

Rully
The northernmost village of the Côte Chalonnaise. Mainly white wines, floral and spicy in character, with soft fruit. The reds are pure, juicy Pinot.
Good producers: Chartron et Trébuchet, Joseph Drouhin, Jaffelin, Olivier Leflaive, Vincent Girardin, Antonin Rodet (Château de Rully).

Saint-Aubin
Fresh, strawberry-flavored reds and delicately balanced whites come from this small village west of Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault. The wines have something of the character of each of these more famous villages.
Good producers: Domaine Jean-Claude Bachelet, Domaine Roux Père et Fils, Louis Jadot, Jaffelin.

Saint-Véran
This is southernmost appellation in Burgundy, and its reds are classified as Beaujolais and made from Gamay. The whites are soft, fresh and fruity, and mature quickly.
Good producers: Georges Duboeuf, Domaine des Lalande, Mommessin, Domaine Saumaize-Michelin, J. J. Vincent et Fils (Domaine des Morats).

Santenay
Some of the best values in the Côte de Beaune. Wines that can be firm and tannic when young, but which develop a foursquare, solid character as they mature. Mainly red, but small quantities of nutty whites are also made.
Good producers: Joseph Drouhin, Vincent Girardin, Louis Jadot, Olivier Leflaive, Prosper Maufoux.

Savigny-lès-Beaune
Savigny is the village with the greatest area of Pinot Noir in the Côte d’Or after Beaune and Santenay. The perfumed wines are full of raspberries and other red fruits, with a fresh lightness of touch. These wines can epitomize the seductiveness of Pinot Noir.
Good producers: Domaine Simon Bize, Bouchard Père et Fils, Domaine Bruno Clair, Joseph Drouhin, Patriarche Père et Fils.

Viré-Clessé
A brand-new appellation, combining two villages formerly under the umbrella of Mâcon-Villages and previously sold as Mâcon-Viré and Mâcon-Clessé. The wines are smoky, musky and generally quite fresh and lightweight.
Good producers: Prosper Maufoux, Mommessin, Domaine Rijckaert l’Epinet.

WHAT TO BUY, WHAT TO DRINK, WHAT TO HOLD

1999 It is rare for both whites and reds from Burgundy to achieve high quality in the same vintage, but 1999 was such a year. Many whites from the Côte d’Or are rich and opulent. Later-picked whites from Chablis are cooler and fresher. The ripe Pinots weren’t spoiled by September rains, and are seen as better than 1998 or 1997, and more like the long-term wines from 1996. The 󈨧s will be worth buying when they are released next year.

1998 A success story for Chardonnay, especially in Chablis, where the acids are the same as 1997, but the wines have greater weight. Some voluptuous whites were made on the Côte d’Or, but the wines are on the whole less successful in the Mâconnais. Among the reds, rains made this a difficult harvest, but the wines are already showing more structure and tannin than the 1997s. These should be wines for keeping.

1997 An uneven vintage, with Pinot Noir sometimes ripening before Chardonnay. On the Côte d’Or, those producers who waited made the best wines. The small production of reds means prices are high, despite mixed results. For the whites, 󈨥 is a fine year, especially in Chablis, where producers made rich, full-flavored wines with good acidity. Keep these wines over the next decade. The wines from the Mâconnais are lighter and should be drunk now.

1996 A vintage rescued by a warm September. Excellent color and promising fruit flavors make this a vintage of long-term aging potential among the reds, with some that won’t peak until 2005 or beyond. The whites have turned out somewhat lean, but should show better in a year or two.

White Wines
87 Faiveley 1997 Cuvée Georges Faiveley (Bourgogne) $17
One of the best basic white Burgundies in a long time. Nice toasty fruit, and a warm, ripe palate with lively flavors alongside some developing maturity. Good fresh finish.

87 Prosper Maufoux 1998 Domaine les Combelières $11 (Viré-Clessé) Ripe fruit, with rich acidity and citrus and green fruit- flavors. Clear, clean wine with a good structure.

86 Bouchard Père et Fils 1998 La Vignée Chardonnay $10 (Bourgogne) Plenty of green-apple fruit and a pleasing hint of butter. Quaffable, but structured like a pricier cru.

86 Georges Duboeuf 1999 Mâcon-Villages $10 Modern, upfront fresh fruit, with good citrus flavors. Balanced, lively palate, with green fruits and acidity at the end.

86 Mommessin 1998 Domaine l’Evêque (Saint-Véran) $13 Ripe, fleshy fruit, with some balancing citrus acidity and a hint of wood and toast. Still young and fresh, this is a wine that should develop well.

85 Henri de Villamont 1997 Prestige Chardonnay (Bourgogne) $13 Nice, ripe simple fruit with just a hint of wood, and good, open flavors. Well-made, attractive wine.

Red Wines
90 Faiveley 1998 Clos des Myglands (Mercurey Premier Cru) $32
A Faiveley monopole, which means the firm owns the whole vineyard. Good deep-purple color. Rich, firm tannins, with ripe, smoky fruit and concentrated ripe flavors. It’s a wine that needs time, but already shows great complexity.

88 Joseph Drouhin 1998 Savigny-lès-Beaune $29 Firm tannins along with sweet, ripe fruit. A structured wine with good aging ability. The finish is dry but there are also good strawberry flavors. Give this wine three or four years.

86 Joseph Drouhin 1998 Laforêt Pinot Noir (Bourgogne) $15 Concentrated red fruits with a fine structure of tannins and acidity. It has enough firmness to develop over two or three years, which is unusual for a wine in this class.

86 Louis Jadot 1998 Clos de Malte (Santenay) $22 Good deep color, with ripe sweet fruit. Good concentrated fruit flavors, with solid tannins and acidity. The big, chewy fruit needs time to soften.

86 Prosper Maufoux 1998 Santenay $22 Ripe fruit and firm, dry tannins. A well-structured wine that strikes a good balance between acidity and red-fruit flavors.


Find out why Anthony Bourdain’s boeuf bourguignon is one of our most popular recipes ever

We have more than 9,200 recipes in our Washington Post Recipe Finder, and we’re adding more every day. The new dishes are what tend to capture the most attention, but there are certain entries in the archives that keep trucking along, gathering a reliable stream of readers years after they were first published.

We don’t always know exactly why. Sometimes, it’s something very search-friendly. In one case, it’s a quirk of Internet indexing. In any event, Anthony Bourdain’s boeuf bourguignon is one of those entries, repeatedly breaking into our most-viewed recipes of the year. The secret sauce? I’m guessing some combination of a famous personality, a classic dish and, well, a darn good sauce, coaxed into rich, silken luxury over two-plus hours of cook time. At close to 200 ratings, with an average score of 4½ stars (out of 5), this is one of our highest- and most-rated recipes.

The recipe first appeared in the Food section in 2004 in a piece by former Post staffer Judith Weinraub about three cookbooks focused on French bistro cooking: Ina Garten’s “Barefoot in Paris,” Bourdain’s “Anthony Bourdain’s Les Halles Cookbook” and Thomas Keller’s “Bouchon.” “Garten’s book is a collection of accessible recipes for meals to serve family and friends. Bourdain’s is a thoughtful guide to classic dishes. And Keller’s is a daunting but inspirational road map to a higher culinary plane,” Weinraub wrote. She had the clever idea to examine the differences in each book’s approach through the lens of boeuf bourguignon, a classic dish featuring beef braised in red wine (i.e. burgundy) and often including onions and mushrooms.

Garten’s quicker version includes some home-cook-friendly shortcuts, while Keller’s requires more than two dozen ingredients, some prepared multiple ways. Bourdain’s falls neatly in the middle, with the shortest ingredient list, leaning more on time than excessive preparation. The emphasis is on the meat and the sauce — ideally served with some potatoes or bread to help you savor every last drop.

The brief intro at the top of the recipe is exactly the kind of summary you’d expect from Bourdain, the globetrotting and outspoken chef, TV host and author who took his own life in 2018. “This dish is much better the second day. Just cool the stew down in an ice bath, or on your countertop (the Health Department is unlikely to raid your kitchen). Refrigerate overnight. When time, heat and serve. Goes well with a few boiled potatoes. But goes really well with a bottle of Cote de Nuit Villages Pommard.” Informative, funny and a little snarky.

I’ll add a few more tips of my own. As far as the wine, don’t be turned off by the burgundy denomination. Burgundy (in this case red) refers to wine made in the Burgundy region of France. Red burgundy is made with pinot noir grapes, so feel free to grab a bottle labeled as pinot noir that fits within your price range. Make it something you will drink — only 1 cup is used in cooking, and you’ll want to sip the rest while you enjoy the dish. Pat your meat as dry as you can before cooking to limit the amount of splattering while you sear. You’ll want to stay within reach during the 2 to 2½ hours of braising time so that you can stir and scrape occasionally to prevent scorching on the bottom of the pot.


Wine Berserkers - international wine social media, online community, and discussion

My favorite GC white for the $ is Jadot Corton Charlemagne.

For 1er, I agree with Bouchard and would add Clos des Mouches Blanc from Drouhin. Niellon 1er whites still offer value. I do enjoy Labet Beaune Marconnets too.

Curious to hear more options.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#3 Post by B. Buzzini » May 9th, 2020, 7:58 pm

Walter Scott. someone had to say it! 18 Anne Cuvée n glass.

Good list. Louis Michel Chablis as well.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#4 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 9th, 2020, 8:06 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#5 Post by Ron Erickson » May 9th, 2020, 8:16 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#6 Post by Sean S y d n e y » May 9th, 2020, 8:17 pm

Drouhin's Montagny that I had a few weeks ago was absolutely wonderful and about $25 USD, if that's not too proletariat.

edit: I see I was beaten just above

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#7 Post by Kris Patten » May 9th, 2020, 8:44 pm

Sean S y d n e y wrote: ↑ May 9th, 2020, 8:17 pm Drouhin's Montagny that I had a few weeks ago was absolutely wonderful and about $25 USD, if that's not too proletariat.

edit: I see I was beaten just above

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#8 Post by Paul Seah » May 9th, 2020, 10:05 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#9 Post by Ian S » May 9th, 2020, 10:14 pm

Alan Eden - the "Crazy Uncle" Berserker and Master Pot Stirrer forever!

"I swear to god, I've never seen so many whiny bitches in one place in my life." - Steve Saxon, 01/30/18
"Moral superiority can taste awfully good to some." - David Kantrowitz, 05/29/19

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#10 Post by dcornutt » May 10th, 2020, 2:36 am

" Care about what other people think and you will always be their prisoner." - LAO TZU

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#11 Post by jason stein » May 10th, 2020, 4:29 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#12 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 5:06 am

Let us start with the Moreaus:

Bernard Moreau Bourgogne Blanc (paid $25 for the 2017), Chassagne-Montrachet and St. Aubin En Remilly
Christian Moreau - premier cru Chablis
Moreau Naudet - premier cru Chablis

Bouchard Meursault Perrieres
Heitz-Lochardet Meursault En la Barre and Meursault Les Gruyaches
Domaine des Moirots - I like his reds better than his whites, but his whites are not bad
Whites from Aubert de Villaine

I have seen some good prices lately on Jadot whites. If premox there really is cured by DIAM, then I would put these as excellent values.

I really like Drouhin's whites, but prices have gone up a good bit over the last couple of years. Can sometimes be good values.

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#13 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 5:09 am

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#14 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 5:26 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#15 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 5:49 am

The last email I got for their wines was from Chambers Street:

Click to view up-to-date inventory on our website →
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
| 12 in stock | $42.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
| 36 in stock | $32.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
| 36 in stock | $63.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
| 7 in stock | $89.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
| 24 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
| 18 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
| 9 in stock | $89.99

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#16 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 5:55 am

Howard Cooper wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 5:49 am The last email I got for their wines was from Chambers Street:

Click to view up-to-date inventory on our website →
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Blanc
| 12 in stock | $42.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Bourgogne Aligoté
| 36 in stock | $32.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin Le Banc
| 36 in stock | $63.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly
| 7 in stock | $89.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Hommage á Marguerite
| 24 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru Les Champlots
| 18 in stock | $79.99
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
Colin-Morey, Pierre-Yves 2018 St Aubin 1er Cru Chatenière
| 9 in stock | $89.99

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#17 Post by Brian S t o t t e r » May 10th, 2020, 5:56 am

Obligatory post in each thread on this topic

I have a couple 2018 X-Novos on their way to me. How's the Anne Cuvee?

CT and IG: rieslinghoarder

2021 WOTY Candidates:
2019 Hofgut Falkenstein Niedermenniger Herrenberg Riesling Spätlese feinherb “Meyer Nepal” #11
2015 Kelley Fox Wines Pinot Noir Maresh Vineyard Red Barn Blocks
1997 Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Scharzhofberger Riesling Auslese
2019 Emrich-Schönleber Halenberg Riesling Grosses Gewächs

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#18 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 7:58 am

B. Buzzini wrote: ↑ May 9th, 2020, 7:58 pm Walter Scott. someone had to say it! 18 Anne Cuvée n glass.

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#19 Post by R. Frankel » May 10th, 2020, 8:16 am

I too really liked the ‘17 PYCM BB. Bought a half case, wanted to see how they aged. Oops, drank them up!

Some more value white Burgs I would add
- Moreau Nadeau - lovely Chablis up and down the range
- Henri Prudhon - mostly St. Aubin and extremely impressive.
- Droin Chablis - also scratches that itch nicely
- Saumaize-Michelin Pouilly-Fuisse - richer wines but also well made.

Sure I’m buying some higher end things - Bernard Moreau, Henri Boillot, a little bit of others but those are less good ‘value’ options I think. I was really impressed by Lamy-Pillot at the 2019 La Paulee but have yet to find them on the west coast at prices I liked.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#20 Post by Rick Allen » May 10th, 2020, 9:30 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#21 Post by Josh Grossman » May 10th, 2020, 10:05 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#22 Post by Chris Seiber » May 10th, 2020, 10:26 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#23 Post by Chris Seiber » May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am

PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#24 Post by Yao C » May 10th, 2020, 10:36 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#25 Post by Yao C » May 10th, 2020, 10:42 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#26 Post by alan weinberg » May 10th, 2020, 10:45 am

there are some occasional opportunities to find PYCM at lesser prices, also Boillot. I paid 95 for 18 Moucheres. I paid 85 for 17 PYCM Ancegnieres. I think those are great values, wines playing above their appellation. I titled the thread best value, not cheapest.

Almost put some of the Moreau on the list.

I had Michel on there, Buzz.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#27 Post by Josh Grossman » May 10th, 2020, 10:59 am

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#28 Post by ykwon » May 10th, 2020, 12:34 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#29 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 12:41 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#30 Post by JLee » May 10th, 2020, 12:49 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#31 Post by jason stein » May 10th, 2020, 12:51 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#32 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 1:00 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#33 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 1:02 pm

"That's what I do. I drink and I know things." Tyrion Lannister

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#34 Post by JLee » May 10th, 2020, 1:06 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#35 Post by Chris Seiber » May 10th, 2020, 1:13 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

If that is all it is, then wouldn't all other White Burgundies have an equivalent pricing spike from the 17 to 18 vintages? And if the tariffs go back down, PYCM pricing will return to a year or two ago?

Again, PYCM makes great wines, and additionally is very much in vogue with buyers, so I'm not surprised or upset that the prices are spiking up. Same way I feel when that happens with a new world wine. But every time a hot Burg or Northern Rhone or Piedmont producer has its price skyrocket, we all have to pretend that it's only because of some shadowy middlemen, tariffs, grey market, or something else at play rather than regular supply and demand. When it's a new world wine, then it's all about greed, score whores, and so forth. It feels like it's more about people confirming their biases about good guys and bad guys than it is an accurate statement about what is going on.

Maybe I'm wrong - I certainly have been before. Explain it to me and I'll listen with an open mind.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#36 Post by Craig G » May 10th, 2020, 1:26 pm

My current best values are the Domaine Renaud Macons (Charnay and Solutré) from K&L. They’re unusually good for $20. There are a bunch of other white Burgs in that range but most of those I’ve tried have been disappointing.

The Bize BB Perrières is really good too. It’s more like $35 or $40.

“You need to look down to the bottom shelf where they keep the Fighting Cock” — Corey N.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#37 Post by [email protected] [email protected] » May 10th, 2020, 1:32 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

If that is all it is, then wouldn't all other White Burgundies have an equivalent pricing spike from the 17 to 18 vintages? And if the tariffs go back down, PYCM pricing will return to a year or two ago?

Again, PYCM makes great wines, and additionally is very much in vogue with buyers, so I'm not surprised or upset that the prices are spiking up. Same way I feel when that happens with a new world wine. But every time a hot Burg or Northern Rhone or Piedmont producer has its price skyrocket, we all have to pretend that it's only because of some shadowy middlemen, tariffs, grey market, or something else at play rather than regular supply and demand. When it's a new world wine, then it's all about greed, score whores, and so forth. It feels like it's more about people confirming their biases about good guys and bad guys than it is an accurate statement about what is going on.

Maybe I'm wrong - I certainly have been before. Explain it to me and I'll listen with an open mind.

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#38 Post by Rick Allen » May 10th, 2020, 1:38 pm

Re: Current best value white Burgundies

#39 Post by Howard Cooper » May 10th, 2020, 1:42 pm

Chris Seiber wrote: ↑ May 10th, 2020, 10:30 am PYCM prices seem to have gone up 20+% just from the 2017 to the 2018 vintages. Imagine what we’d all say if a California producer did that.

Oh well, I got to enjoy a few vintages of them before the prices went crazy. And I can’t blame the guy for charging what people will pay for them. They’re excellent wines.

I probably have 10 bottles or so, now I transition into the “reluctant to drink them because I can’t afford to replace them” mode.

If that is all it is, then wouldn't all other White Burgundies have an equivalent pricing spike from the 17 to 18 vintages? And if the tariffs go back down, PYCM pricing will return to a year or two ago?

Again, PYCM makes great wines, and additionally is very much in vogue with buyers, so I'm not surprised or upset that the prices are spiking up. Same way I feel when that happens with a new world wine. But every time a hot Burg or Northern Rhone or Piedmont producer has its price skyrocket, we all have to pretend that it's only because of some shadowy middlemen, tariffs, grey market, or something else at play rather than regular supply and demand. When it's a new world wine, then it's all about greed, score whores, and so forth. It feels like it's more about people confirming their biases about good guys and bad guys than it is an accurate statement about what is going on.

Maybe I'm wrong - I certainly have been before. Explain it to me and I'll listen with an open mind.


Steak with Burgundy Mushroom Sauce

In a large skillet, melt butter over high heat. Throw in mushrooms, garlic, and green onions and cook, stirring occasionally until mushrooms are nice and golden. Pour in wine and stir, scraping bottoms of the pan. Allow to cook for several minutes or until liquid is reduced by at least half. At the end, add 1 tablespoon butter and stir into sauce. Add parsley and stir together. Don't be afraid to splash in a little more wine if needed.

Fry a steak in a separate skillet till medium rare.

Spoon mushrooms sauce over the top.

I am in love with heavy, ingredient-rich steak sauces.

Marlboro Man, on the other hand, believes a good steak should stand on its own.

We&rsquoll be seeking outside help for this fundamental life disagreement, but for today, I wanted to show you how to make this quick and easy mushroom sauce for whatever steak you feel like cooking tonight. A sirloin will work, or a skirt steak&hellipor a fillet or a ribeye or anything else you might have languishing in your fridge. Whatever steak you decide to use, just know that the sauce will make it better.


Julia Child’s Beef Bourguignon

This recipe is adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child. It’s somewhat of a long recipe, but no one ever said French cooking was easy. Have a glass of wine while preparing this wonderful dish, and the results will be rewarding.

Ingredients:

  • 3 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 pounds lean stewing beef, cut into 2-inch cubes
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • One 6-ounce piece of chunk bacon
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 3 cups red wine (burgundy)
  • 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 cups brown beef stock
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 cloves mashed garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme
  • A crumbled bay leaf
  • 18 to 24 small peeled white onions (about 1″ in diameter)
  • 3 1/2 tablespoons butter
  • Herb bouquet (4 parsley sprigs, one-half bay leaf, one-quarter teaspoon thyme, tied in cheesecloth)
  • 1 pound mushrooms, fresh and quartered

Cooking Instructions:

Remove bacon rind and cut into lardons (sticks 1/4-inch thick and 1 1/2 inches long). Simmer rind and lardons for 10 minutes in 1 1/2 quarts water. Drain and dry.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Sauté lardons in 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a flameproof casserole over moderate heat for 2 to 3 minutes to brown lightly. Remove to a side dish with a slotted spoon.

Dry beef in paper towels it will not brown if it is damp. Heat fat in casserole until almost smoking. Add beef, a few pieces at a time, and sauté until nicely browned on all sides. Add it to the lardons.

In the same fat, brown the sliced vegetables. Pour out the excess fat.

Return the beef and bacon to the casserole and toss with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper.

Then sprinkle on the flour and toss again to coat the beef lightly. Set casserole uncovered in middle position of preheated oven for 4 minutes.

Toss the meat again and return to oven for 4 minutes (this browns the flour and coves the meat with a light crust).

Remove casserole and turn oven down to 325 degrees.

Stir in wine and 2 to 3 cups stock, just enough so that the meat is barely covered.

Add the tomato paste, garlic, herbs and bacon rind. Bring to a simmer on top of the stove.

Cover casserole and set in lower third of oven. Regulate heat so that liquid simmers very slowly for 3 to 4 hours. The meat is done when a fork pierces it easily.

While the beef is cooking, prepare the onions and mushrooms.

Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons butter with one and one-half tablespoons of the oil until bubbling in a skillet.

Add onions and sauté over moderate heat for about 10 minutes, rolling them so they will brown as evenly as possible. Be careful not to break their skins. You cannot expect them to brown uniformly.

Add 1/2 cup of the stock, salt and pepper to taste and the herb bouquet.

Cover and simmer slowly for 40 to 50 minutes until the onions are perfectly tender but hold their shape, and the liquid has evaporated. Remove herb bouquet and set onions aside.

Wipe out skillet and heat remaining oil and butter over high heat. As soon as you see butter has begun to subside, indicating it is hot enough, add mushrooms.

Toss and shake pan for 4 to 5 minutes. As soon as they have begun to brown lightly, remove from heat.

When the meat is tender, pour the contents of the casserole into a sieve set over a saucepan.

Wash out the casserole and return the beef and lardons to it. Distribute the cooked onions and mushrooms on top.

Skim fat off sauce in saucepan. Simmer sauce for a minute or 2, skimming off additional fat as it rises. You should have about 2 1/2 cups of sauce thick enough to coat a spoon lightly.

If too thin, boil it down rapidly. If too thick, mix in a few tablespoons stock. Taste carefully for seasoning.

Pour sauce over meat and vegetables. Cover and simmer 2 to 3 minutes, basting the meat and vegetables with the sauce several times.

Serve in casserole, or arrange stew on a platter surrounded with potatoes, noodles or rice, and decorated with parsley.

Please leave your experiences with this recipe in the comments section below.


Top 10 Hypnotic Liquor Drinks with Recipes and Prices

With the change in times, hypnotic liquor has become a famous drink for the celebrities. Since, its release into the market, it has become one of the most staple products in many bars. The alcoholic level in hypnotic liquor is 17% and it is distilled three times during the process.

(1) Green Bean recipe

The required items are 1 oz of orange juice and 3 oz hypnotic liquor. Serve the blend of these two and then garnish it with vegetables of your choice. This drink costs you about $26 dollars.

(2) Green machine recipe

5-6 oz mountain dew or any citrus soda and 1 oz of hypnotic liquor, Pour this mixture into a highball glass which is filled with the ice-cubes. Then fill it up with soda or mountain dew. Stir the mixture slowly and the drink will automatically turn into bright green. This bright green drink costs is $27 dollars.

(3) Hypnotic and 7 recipe

A blend of 1 splash of soda or 7 up and 2 oz hypnotic liquor, stir the ingredients thoroughly and serve it in a highball glass at an expense of $ 28 dollars.

(4) Hypno fusion recipe

A blend of 1 splash of grenadine, 5 oz sprite or soda or 1 oz hypnotic liquor, fills your highball glass along with ice cubes. Then add hypnotic liquor and sprite. At last add a splash of grenadine, stir it well and serve at $ 30 dollars.

(5) Chucktown crunk juice recipe

4 oz of hypnotic liquor and 8 oz red bull can or energy drink. Serve it in a tall glass without chilled at an expense of $30 dollars.

(6) Bloody passion #2 recipe

Thoroughly mix 2-3 oz of pineapple juice, 2 oz of hypnotic liquor and one dash of grenadine syrup. Pour the mixture into a tall glass either chilled or without chilled. Add some amount of pineapple juice and then it should be followed by splashes of grenadine. Stir it well and serve it at a cost of $ 25 dollars.

(7) H-Bomb #2 recipe

Make a blend of 3 oz of hypnotic liquor and 3 oz of Red Bull energy drink. Pour the content into a highball glass with ice cubes and half way filled with Red Bull, then fills the remaining half with hypnotic liquor and serve. This drink costs you about $26 dollars.

(8) Naughty monkey recipe

Combine 5 oz of either soda or 7 up or 1 ½ oz of hypnotic liquor and serve it in a highball glass and serve it chilled at a cost of $25 dollars.

(9) Hypnotic pussy recipe

Thoroughly mix 2 oz of hypnotic liquor and 2 oz of sour raspberry liquor and shake the ingredients thoroughly using a cocktail shaker and strain into a glass and serve it chilled. This sour raspberry liquor is available at $28 dollars.

(10) Jimmy’s Jet plane recipe

Required ingredients are ¼ oz of lime juice, 2 oz of pineapple juice, ½ melon liquor and apple liquor and 1 oz of hypnotic liquor. Thoroughly mix all the ingredients and strain it into a tall glass filled with ice. Then garnish it with an airplane shaped candy and a lemon wheel. This is a perfect candy, which comes in various colors at $ 27 dollars.

These are some of the most popular hypnotic liquor drinks in the world, which has attracted numbers of people to follow the dink trend.


Watch the video: TOP 8 ARMWRESTLING ALL MATCHES (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Dunly

    Infinite topic

  2. Mac Asgaill

    Takes a bad turn.

  3. Kejas

    I apologize, but I think you are wrong. I can prove it.

  4. Othman

    I apologize, but in my opinion you admit the mistake. Write to me in PM, we will discuss.

  5. Poni

    It is remarkable, a very useful phrase

  6. Faerwald

    It seems to me the brilliant idea

  7. JoJojind

    dyaya .... old temka, but there is no mi ^^ even if you do not look at the pictures))) no fsё ^ _ ^

  8. Richie

    Respect for the author. The info turned out to be very useful.



Write a message