New recipes

Raymond Hook’s 2014 Fancy Food Show Finds

Raymond Hook’s 2014 Fancy Food Show Finds

The 60th Summer Fancy Food Show was held June 29 through July 1, 2014 at the Javits Center in New York City. Our weekly cheese columnist Raymond Hook spent these three days walking the aisles of the show, investigating the thousands (!) of vendors exhibiting a vast array of specialty food items. Here is a list of his top five favorite Summer Fancy Food Show finds. Be on the lookout for these innovative products in the coming months!

Tonewood Maple Cubes — Pure maple sugar in the shape of a cube. This novelty comes in both light and dark versions and is intended to be grated and sprinkled on top of anything that strikes your fancy. Tonewood suggests shaving it over oatmeal, fruit, and yogurt for breakfast, or you can microplane it over ice cream, pancakes, or a cocktail for added sweetness. These cubes of pressed maple sugar are the perfect way to add a touch of deep maple flavor without overpowering a dish. When grated right from the block, the flavor is pure and the aroma is pleasantly strong.

Lotus Foods Organic Forbidden Rice® Ramen — Made from their organic heirloom Forbidden Rice®, this Japanese-style noodle is gluten free and incredibly tasty. The Forbidden Rice® is black rice, which makes this ramen stand out both visually and flavor-wise. At the show, Lotus served it in a traditional mild vinegar sauce with a bit of sesame oil and a few chopped veggies: simple, clean and healthy with a surprising depth of flavor. A lot of folks I know are gluten free, and I will definitely be recommending this satisfying noodle to all of them.

Grace and I Fruit and Nut Press — Made in Los Angeles, Calif. from mostly organic ingredients, these “presses” feature beautiful layers of pressed apples and plums with chopped almonds, pecans, hazelnuts and walnuts. These blocks look great as part of a cheese presentation, or they can be eaten on their own as a wholesome snack. I stumbled upon this unique product in the Cypress Grove Chevre company booth, where the owners feature specialty items from fledgling producers free of charge to help these small, promising businesses grow. It’s inspiring to see a successful company give new producers the opportunity to be seen by so many Food Show attendees in their extremely busy booth!

Boska —I returned to the Boska booth more than once during the show and spent quite a bit of time admiring (i.e., coveting) their astounding array of high-quality cheese tools. Boska crafts tools at all levels: high-production cutting tools, professional-quality tools for the cheesemonger, and presentation and serving sets for your average cheesehead. They have so many cheese-specific tools that if forced to pick a favorite I honestly don’t think I could. Beautiful Raclette machines, fondue sets of all kinds, every knife you could possibly need for slicing cheese, classy cutting boards… these tools offer quality and variety at all price points.

Lark Fine Foods Salted Rosemary Shortbread — These are, as Lark Fine Foods advertises, “cookies for grown-ups™.” Crisp but not dry; slightly sweet with subtle herbal flavors, and just the right amount of crispy sea salt. They have all the buttery richness that cookie fiends like myself seek in a shortbread, but it’s their delicate rosemary flavor that elevates them to the top of their class. The bakers at Lark have achieved a perfect balance of flavors with this cookie and managed to turn a very simple treat into a true delicacy. Try nibbling these with a strong cup of Earl Grey tea.

Additional reporting by Madeleine James.


Season 49, Episode 20
TCR #1752

Tucker Bowling – Daryl & Danny Tucker. 215 N Harris St, Tulia, TX 79088 MAP 806-995-3635

Midpoint Cafe – Brenda Hammit. 305 W Historic Rte 66, Adrian, TX 79001 MAP 806-538-6379

Hawk Photographer – Chris Ducharme. Austin, TX. [email protected]


I Do My Thinking Myself: The Modernist Detective and Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep

Chandler, Raymond. The Big Sleep. 1939. Reprint, London: Penguin, 2014.

Philip Marlowe takes a case for an old general by the name of Sternwood. A rich man, Sternwood has two daughters who run wild. He has received some IOUs—a spot of blackmail for one of the daughters (Carmen)—and wants Marlowe to look into it. As Marlowe is leaving the Sternwood mansion, the general’s other daughter, Vivian (Regan) calls him in to ask if he has been asked to find her estranged husband, who departed suddenly not long ago. He hasn’t, but he will before he gets out of the mess he’s just walked into.

The Big Sleep, Chandler’s first novel, furnishes a complex and twisty plot in which bad guys and good guys alike go down like dominoes. A woman’s ex-lover shoots a man who is photographing said woman in the nude and steals the photo plate, only to have it taken from him. The thief gets killed by the dead photographer’s lover then the thief’s girlfriend tries to sell some information about the vanished husband’s ex-lover and winds up getting her intermediary killed by the ex-lover’s bodyguard . . . there’s more, but maybe I’ve made my point. At every turn, wisps of truth float through Marlowe’s fingers as he tries to figure out who knows what and who’s lying to him (hint: it’s almost everyone).

The book is set quite firmly in Los Angeles in the 1930s. Prohibition is over and so, largely, is the recession the oil derricks[1], which were responsible for putting the city on the map, are beginning to lose their primacy on the landscape, and the place is starting to grow rapidly. Not every detail of the book holds up well by modern standards. For example, the amount of fuss Marlowe kicks up about some pornographic books seems silly by the standards of the internet. A young woman being photographed nude is potentially a major scandal, whereas today it can make someone’s career. There’s a gay character who isn’t treated very well (although to be fair, when Marlowe chews him out, he has just murdered a man in front of Marlowe), and there’s a somewhat perplexing racial slur.[2] In addition, the question of who killed the chauffeur is famously left unresolved—however, I have to admit that had I not read an anecdote in which Chandler confessed to not knowing either, I likely wouldn’t have noticed that detail. Throughout, if these petty complaints ever threaten to overwhelm the story, Chandler throws in another beautifully crafted line to make the reader forget her complaints—although calling them lines fails to acknowledge how masterful his prose is in sum, how well-chosen each word is.

At the end of the book, we leave Marlowe in a bar in something of a moral quandary. Midway through the book, he mentions a chess board in his room: “There was a problem laid out on the board, a six-mover. I couldn’t solve it, like a lot of my problems. I reached down and moved a knight. . . . The move with the knight was wrong. I put it back where I had moved it from. Knights had no meaning in this game. It wasn’t a game for knights” (168–170). By the final pages, Marlowe has taken over the role of the knight, and in doing so proved himself correct. He cannot apprehend the murderer or even reveal the location of the murdered man’s body lest he give the game away. All his attempts to protect the general and his daughters have backed him into a corner. And so he drinks and ruminates fatalistically on death, “the big sleep” (250). This paralysis is intentional. In effect, Chandler is producing a treatise on the modernist detective novel, and does as effective a job in defining it as he does in his famous essay, “The Simple Art of Murder.”

The Victorian detective, epitomized by Sherlock Holmes, is a figure of romanticized panopticism. No matter how grave or petty a crime is, no matter how complex, Holmes reassures us that the criminal will be found. Marlowe, in his own words, is not Sherlock Holmes: “I don’t expect to go over ground the police have covered and pick up a broken pen point and build a case from it. If you think there is anybody in the detective business making a living doing that sort of thing, you don’t know much about cops. It’s not things like that they overlook if they overlook anything” (131). Later he adds, “I’m a very smart guy. I haven’t a feeling or a scruple in the world. All I have the itch for is money. I am so money greedy that for twenty-five bucks a day and expenses, mostly gasoline and whisky, I do my thinking myself, what there is of it: I risk my whole future, the hatred of the cops and of [gangsters]. I dodge bullets and eat saps and say thank you very much” (247–248). Unlike the comparatively aloofness of earlier detectives (such as the aforementioned Holmes Philo Vance, who is also namechecked by Marlowe or C. Auguste Dupin) who never get their hands dirty, Marlowe cares about his cases and spends his time sticking his nose in where it’s not wanted. He also reflects on the process of detection and how it has been represented to his clients.[3] The world has changed a lot since 1893 on the eve of the second World War, there are no reassurances to be found.

Ultimately I don’t think this is Chandler’s greatest novel—I’d give that accolade to The Long Goodbye—but don’t let that hold you back from reading it. Chandler, even on a bad day, is better than most contemporary writers could ever hope to be.

[2] Perplexing in that I’ve never seen an expression like that used. It was clear from context that it was slightly derogatory in some way.


14 Ways To Instantly Upgrade Your Peanut Butter And Jelly (RECIPES)

There is no sandwich more perfect than the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Although it's nothing fancy -- just two pieces of bread topped with peanut butter (on both sides) and jelly -- the two spreads get along like lifelong friends.

Peanut butter and jelly work harmoniously together to make sandwich perfection. The sweet jelly cuts the stickiness of the peanut butter in the nicest of ways. And peanut butter balances out the sugariness of the fruity jelly.

While we do prescribe to the "if it ain't broke don't fix it" school of thought, we can't help but feel creative when thoughts of PB&J are in our heads. Not only can you make cakes, cookies and muffins with this perfect duo (seriously, you need to try these), but we've found countless ways to upgrade your everyday PB&J -- not that it needs it, but just for kicks. Think bacon, chocolate and French toast.

Scroll down for the 14 ways you can make your peanut butter and jelly sandwich even better than it already is.

Want to read more from HuffPost Taste? Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Tumblr.


Raymond Hook’s 2014 Fancy Food Show Finds - Recipes

Who’s ready for an outdoor refresh? I know I am! David Quarles, Interior Designer and HomeGoods Style Expert, here to give you a little outdoor inspiration and show you how I revamped my backyard with some HomeGoods magic! Hope you&hellip

Give Mom the Spa Treatment for Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is approaching, and I have some ideas for you that I’m sure Mom will approve of! Why not gift her everything she needs to create a lovely spa retreat at home? That’s what I have prepared, and I’d&hellip

Stylish Inspiration for Summer Porch Entertaining

Once summer hits, I try to spend a lot of time outdoors. That’s why I think it’s important to make outdoor spaces as comfortable as indoor ones. I recently visited my local HomeGoods to pick up new goodies for my&hellip

Spring Spruce Ups

Hi everyone! With Spring in full swing, two of our HomeGoods Style Experts – Beth Diana Smith & Jenny Reimold – are here to share how they incorporated their latest HomeGoods finds into a Spring spruce up. Whether you’re a&hellip

Delicious and Unique Spring Dessert Recipes

With spring nipping at our heels, I thought it would be fun to put together a spread of delicious and unique spring dessert recipes and I hope one of these desserts will make it to your table. Delicious and Unique&hellip

Fresh Easter Baskets for 2021

Easter is right around the corner and we are all thinking about our kids’ Easter baskets! Even during these hard times and this pandemic, it’s still fun to get a basket together with lots of (extra) goodies for all the&hellip

Easter Buffet Bar

I am always very excited to share Easter decoration ideas because it means warmer weather is here! Today I am going to share the cutest Easter treat station using items from your home and a few Easter goodies from HomeGoods.&hellip

A Rustic Modern Easter Dining Room with wooden bunnies

Spring is finally here and that means Easter is right around the corner. We moved into our new house a year ago and I am finally getting around to setting up our dining room. I decided to create a rustic&hellip

Revive Your Overlooked Dish Pantry

As soon as the New Year started, I wanted to start fresh and try to organize every part of my house. I wanted to start 2021 on a good foot and make it 100 times better than 2020. A lot&hellip

Tips to Create a Sweet Treats Display for Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day always seems to sneak up on me. That’s why this year I’ve planned ahead and created two unique, colorful, and tasty displays of sweet treats to celebrate this love-filled day. I’m so thrilled to be able to share&hellip

5 Valentine Gift Basket Ideas for Everyone

It is hard to believe that Valentine’s day is just around the corner. That day full of love and chocolate hearts wrapped in foil and otherwise known as ‘Sweethearts Day’- is full of all things sweet. And while you might&hellip

Multi-Purpose Space for the Entire Family

Functional Workspaces Let’s face it, this past year we’ve been spending A LOT of time at home! We’ve had to adapt to new ways of working, studying, and even communicating. I’m here to share how I created a multi-purpose space&hellip

Creating a Cozy, Warm Home This Season

When the weather and seasons start changing and we spend more time indoors- creating a warm and welcoming place to relax is key. This year, we are also spending more time working, teaching and learning at home. And that means&hellip

Elevate Your Everyday: Coffee and Tea Snack Board

These days most of us are spending more time at home. The good news is that it doesn’t have to be boring or bland! Inspired by HomeGoods’ Gourmet Food section, I’m sharing a beautiful and delicious snack idea you can&hellip

Guaranteed Gifting

Spend less, gift better this holiday season at HomeGoods! Insta-gifts. Insta-savings. Insta-LOVE. Hurry in to check off your list in just one trip! Skip the I-O-U’s. No shipping delays means guaranteed gifting for less.

Kitchen-Inspired Christmas Decor and Gift Ideas

When it comes to Christmas, the one place in my home where I spend the most time would have to be my kitchen. Whether I’m whipping up another batch of Christmas cookies or entertaining friends and family, the kitchen is&hellip

7 Tips for Creating a Cozy Christmas Bedroom

A twinkling tree, fairy lights, candles and all that Christmas cheer makes the house feel so magical during the holidays. The holiday season is full of hustle and bustle and busy. Though this year the holidays are looking&hellip

Freshen up your Ho Ho Home for the Holiday

Christmas 2020 is definitely going to be different than the rest. That’s why it was important for me to make it extra special. Today I’m excited to share with you all my living room Christmas décor! I went with some&hellip

Season’s Treatings… Holiday Dessert Bar

Hello December! It’s the best time of the year, and this year we need to celebrate BIG! We may not be able to gather as we normally would, but there is still plenty of room for dessert! So why not&hellip

10 Decorating Tips for a Stand-Out Tree with Jenny Reimold

Style Expert, Jenny Reimold here to help you kick-off the holiday season in style! In our home, the holiday season truly begins when the Christmas tree is decorated. And what better place to look for decorations than at HomeGoods (which&hellip

Countdown to Christmas with Style

The countdown to Christmas is on! Do you have a special way to countdown the days until Christmas? Last week I setup a festive vignette in our home filled with goodies and treats for kids and adults. I picked&hellip

HomeGoods Studio

Check out HomeGoods Studio – our new Instagram Live Class series that invites you to explore your creativity, get inspired, and try something new – all from the comfort of your home! Join our instructors as they guide you through&hellip

Thanksgiving Dessert

This year has been extremely difficult for everyone to say the least. All we can do is hope for change and that we can soon be reunited with our families for special moments and holidays as we usually do. This&hellip

Tips for an Outdoor Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is just around the corner – and though holiday celebrations look a little different this year – they can be festive and fun while staying safe. From setting a table outdoors to creating cozy areas for family to sit&hellip

Thankful to be Home

Many of us are spending a lot of time at home these days. As the year comes to a close, we are reminded of the things we are thankful for. There is nothing more important to me than family,&hellip

Give Mom the Spa Treatment for Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is approaching, and I have some ideas for you that I’m sure Mom will approve of! Why not gift her everything she needs to create a lovely spa retreat at home? That’s what I have prepared, and I’d&hellip

Stylish Inspiration for Summer Porch Entertaining

Once summer hits, I try to spend a lot of time outdoors. That’s why I think it’s important to make outdoor spaces as comfortable as indoor ones. I recently visited my local HomeGoods to pick up new goodies for my&hellip

Spring Spruce Ups

Hi everyone! With Spring in full swing, two of our HomeGoods Style Experts – Beth Diana Smith & Jenny Reimold – are here to share how they incorporated their latest HomeGoods finds into a Spring spruce up. Whether you’re a&hellip

Delicious and Unique Spring Dessert Recipes

With spring nipping at our heels, I thought it would be fun to put together a spread of delicious and unique spring dessert recipes and I hope one of these desserts will make it to your table. Delicious and Unique&hellip

Fresh Easter Baskets for 2021

Easter is right around the corner and we are all thinking about our kids’ Easter baskets! Even during these hard times and this pandemic, it’s still fun to get a basket together with lots of (extra) goodies for all the&hellip

Easter Buffet Bar

I am always very excited to share Easter decoration ideas because it means warmer weather is here! Today I am going to share the cutest Easter treat station using items from your home and a few Easter goodies from HomeGoods.&hellip

A Rustic Modern Easter Dining Room with wooden bunnies

Spring is finally here and that means Easter is right around the corner. We moved into our new house a year ago and I am finally getting around to setting up our dining room. I decided to create a rustic&hellip

Revive Your Overlooked Dish Pantry

As soon as the New Year started, I wanted to start fresh and try to organize every part of my house. I wanted to start 2021 on a good foot and make it 100 times better than 2020. A lot&hellip

Tips to Create a Sweet Treats Display for Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day always seems to sneak up on me. That’s why this year I’ve planned ahead and created two unique, colorful, and tasty displays of sweet treats to celebrate this love-filled day. I’m so thrilled to be able to share&hellip

5 Valentine Gift Basket Ideas for Everyone

It is hard to believe that Valentine’s day is just around the corner. That day full of love and chocolate hearts wrapped in foil and otherwise known as ‘Sweethearts Day’- is full of all things sweet. And while you might&hellip

Multi-Purpose Space for the Entire Family

Functional Workspaces Let’s face it, this past year we’ve been spending A LOT of time at home! We’ve had to adapt to new ways of working, studying, and even communicating. I’m here to share how I created a multi-purpose space&hellip

Creating a Cozy, Warm Home This Season

When the weather and seasons start changing and we spend more time indoors- creating a warm and welcoming place to relax is key. This year, we are also spending more time working, teaching and learning at home. And that means&hellip

Elevate Your Everyday: Coffee and Tea Snack Board

These days most of us are spending more time at home. The good news is that it doesn’t have to be boring or bland! Inspired by HomeGoods’ Gourmet Food section, I’m sharing a beautiful and delicious snack idea you can&hellip

Guaranteed Gifting

Spend less, gift better this holiday season at HomeGoods! Insta-gifts. Insta-savings. Insta-LOVE. Hurry in to check off your list in just one trip! Skip the I-O-U’s. No shipping delays means guaranteed gifting for less.

Kitchen-Inspired Christmas Decor and Gift Ideas

When it comes to Christmas, the one place in my home where I spend the most time would have to be my kitchen. Whether I’m whipping up another batch of Christmas cookies or entertaining friends and family, the kitchen is&hellip

7 Tips for Creating a Cozy Christmas Bedroom

A twinkling tree, fairy lights, candles and all that Christmas cheer makes the house feel so magical during the holidays. The holiday season is full of hustle and bustle and busy. Though this year the holidays are looking&hellip

Freshen up your Ho Ho Home for the Holiday

Christmas 2020 is definitely going to be different than the rest. That’s why it was important for me to make it extra special. Today I’m excited to share with you all my living room Christmas décor! I went with some&hellip

Season’s Treatings… Holiday Dessert Bar

Hello December! It’s the best time of the year, and this year we need to celebrate BIG! We may not be able to gather as we normally would, but there is still plenty of room for dessert! So why not&hellip

10 Decorating Tips for a Stand-Out Tree with Jenny Reimold

Style Expert, Jenny Reimold here to help you kick-off the holiday season in style! In our home, the holiday season truly begins when the Christmas tree is decorated. And what better place to look for decorations than at HomeGoods (which&hellip

Countdown to Christmas with Style

The countdown to Christmas is on! Do you have a special way to countdown the days until Christmas? Last week I setup a festive vignette in our home filled with goodies and treats for kids and adults. I picked&hellip

HomeGoods Studio

Check out HomeGoods Studio – our new Instagram Live Class series that invites you to explore your creativity, get inspired, and try something new – all from the comfort of your home! Join our instructors as they guide you through&hellip

Thanksgiving Dessert

This year has been extremely difficult for everyone to say the least. All we can do is hope for change and that we can soon be reunited with our families for special moments and holidays as we usually do. This&hellip

Tips for an Outdoor Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is just around the corner – and though holiday celebrations look a little different this year – they can be festive and fun while staying safe. From setting a table outdoors to creating cozy areas for family to sit&hellip

Thankful to be Home

Many of us are spending a lot of time at home these days. As the year comes to a close, we are reminded of the things we are thankful for. There is nothing more important to me than family,&hellip

Sign up for email to get fresh inspiration & the latest news right to your inbox.**

*Hours vary by store. Check your local store for details.

**By registering for email communications, you agree to the HomeGoods Terms of Use. The HomeGoods Privacy Policy provides more information about the collection and use of your personal information.

The TJX Rewards® Platinum Mastercard® is issued by Synchrony Bank pursuant to a license by Mastercard® International Incorporated. Mastercard® is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard® International Incorporated.


Contents

The Tatars and raw meat Edit

A popular caricature of Mongol warriors—called Tatars or Tartars—has them tenderizing meat under their saddles, then eating it raw. This story was popularized by Jean de Joinville in the 13th century. [1] But Joinville never encountered Mongols himself and used this as a way of showing that they were uncivilized. [2] It is possible that this story was a confusion originating in the use of thin slices of meat to protect saddle sores from further rubbing. [3]

Popularization of raw meat in Europe and the United States Edit

In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This kind of fillet was beef minced by hand, lightly salted and often smoked, and usually served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs. [4] [5] Hamburg steak gained popularity because of its ease of preparation and decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day. [6] Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg. [7]

It is not known when the first restaurant recipe for steak tartare appeared. [8] While not providing a clear name, it's possible that the dish was popularized in Paris by restaurateurs who misunderstood Jules Verne's description of "Koulbat" (". a patty of crushed meat and eggs. ") in his 1875 novel Michael Strogoff. [9]

Origins of the name Edit

In the early twentieth century, what is now generally known as "steak tartare", was in Europe called steack à l'Americaine. One variation on that dish included serving it with tartar sauce the 1921 edition of Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire defines "Steack à la tartare" as steack à l'Americaine made without egg yolk, served with tartar sauce on the side. "Steack à la tartare" (literally meaning "served with tartar sauce") was later shorted to "steak tartare" [10] [11] Over time, the distinction between steack à l'Americaine and its tartar-sauce variant disappeared. The 1938 edition of Larousse Gastronomique describes steak tartare as raw ground beef served with a raw egg yolk, without any mention of tartar sauce.

It has also been called "Tartar steak" in English. [12]

"À la tartare" or simply "tartare" can still mean "served with tartar sauce" for some dishes, mostly fried fish. [13] At the same time, the name "tartare" is also sometimes applied to other dishes of raw meats or fish, such as tuna tartare, introduced in 1975 by the restaurant Le Duc in Paris. [14]

Health concerns have reduced the popularity of this meat dish in some parts of the world because of the danger of contamination by bacteria and parasites [15] such as Toxoplasma gondii and Taenia saginata.

Bacteria Edit

When basic hygienic rules are followed and fresh meat is used, the risk of bacterial infection is low. [16]

Parasites Edit

Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that may be found in raw or undercooked meat. [17] A multicentre case-control study found inadequately cooked or inadequately cured meat as the main risk factor for toxoplasma infection in all centres. [18] Due to the risk of congenital toxoplasmosis in the fetus, pregnant women are advised not to eat raw meat. [19] Latent toxoplasmosis in adults has been associated with, but not proven to cause, psychological effects [20] and lower IQ [21] in some studies.

Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) may also be acquired via ingestion of undercooked beef. The tapeworm is transmitted to humans via infectious larval cysts that are found in cattle. People with taeniasis may not know they have a tapeworm infection, due to the fact that the symptoms are usually mild or nonexistent. But, it is still possible to develop cysticercosis.

Europe Edit

Steak tartare is found in many European cuisines.

The Belgian version, filet américain (also known as préparé), is generally made with mayonnaise and seasoned with capers and fresh herbs. It was formerly made of horse meat. It is usually served with french fries. [22]

In the Czech Republic and Slovakia steak tartare (tatarský biftek) is found in many restaurants. The meat is ground lean sirloin and has a raw egg yolk in a dimple in the middle. The meat can be premixed with herbs and spices, but usually the customer is given spices and condiments to add to taste. Steak tartare is typically served with toasted bread and raw garlic cloves for rubbing on the bread.

In Poland, steak tartare is known as "tatar" or "befsztyk tatarski" and is traditionally served as an appetizer with diced onions, pickled dills, pickled mushrooms, egg yolk, spices, and, optionally, yeast extract or coriander.

A variant of steak tartare is also present in Danish smørrebrød, where it is served on rugbrød (rye bread) with assorted toppings. [ citation needed ]

In Sweden, steak tartare, råbiff, is usually served with raw egg yolk, raw onions, diced pickled beetroot and capers. In Finland, tartarpihvi is served with raw egg yolk, raw onions, pickled and salted cucumbers and capers. Variations of the dish include dressing with buttermilk sauce and salmon roe. The (European) Russian version can include pickled and salted mushrooms and toasted white bread.

North America Edit

Steak tartare is served at many high-end restaurants in the United States. [23]

In Wisconsin, a steak tartare sandwich, called a "cannibal sandwich", is popular among the descendants of German immigrants it uses sirloin, rye bread, salt, pepper and chopped onions. [24] [25]

South America Edit

Chilean cuisine features a dish of prepared raw beef called crudos.

In southern Brazil, influenced by German immigrants, it is known as Hackepeter or Carne de Onça in Curitiba where this dish is very common and served covered with chives. [26]

Africa Edit

Ethiopians have long eaten a dish of raw, minced beef called kitfo. [27]

In the British TV series Mr. Bean second episode, "The Return of Mr. Bean", the titular character visits a luxury restaurant and is served a steak tartare. After realizing it is not what he expected, he tries a variety of strategies to avoid eating it.

In season 2, episode 5 of the American TV series Mad Men, Don Draper orders steak tartare for Bobbie Barrett, the wife of one of Sterling Cooper’s clients.


N.J. Lawmaker Seeks To Raise Gas Taxes To Pay For Roads, Bridges

TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — New Jersey has developed a reputation for having some the cheapest gas prices in the metro area. But a top lawmaker is proposing to change that by hiking a tax to pay for repairs to the state’s crumbling roads and bridges.

State Sen. Raymond Lesniak, D-Union, introduced legislation Monday that would raise the tax five cents a gallon a year for the next three years, CBS 2’s Scott Rapoport reported.

“If we don’t do it, it will be a disaster in the state of New Jersey for sure,” Lesniak said.

Lesniak told The Star-Ledger the tax increase would generate $240 million a year in new revenue.

“No one likes paying taxes, but nobody likes their cars broken down because of potholes not repaired or also stuck in traffic for hours on end,” he said.

New Jersey currently has the second-lowest gas tax in the nation. At 14.5 cents per gallon, it has not been raised since 1992.

A lot of drivers Rapoport spoke said they would like to keep it that way.

“We’re already paying enough taxes on everything else,” one woman said. “So why add it on gas?”

“It’s going to hurt the little guys,” one man told Rapoport. “It’s never going to hurt rich people, but it’ll hurt little people.”

Lesniak’s proposal has support from other Democrats, but is likely to hit a roadblock from Gov. Chris Christie, who has voiced opposition to the idea in the past. Two recent polls show a large majority of New Jersey residents also are against it.

Lesniak, who also proposed a 2-cent gas tax increase in 2010, said the cost per driver will be less than $100 per year.

“The cost of not doing it, of not making these repairs, is even greater,” Lesniak said.


You will now receive updates from Good Food - Newsletter

Get the latest news and updates emailed straight to your inbox.

By submitting your email you are agreeing to Fairfax Media's terms and conditions and privacy policy.

At 17, he left South Africa for Britain with no particular plans and enough money to see him through for a month without work. Within six hours of getting off the plane, he'd been mugged in a Soho strip club – the only place he and his friends could find, apparently, to get a beer. The biff-magnet was threatened by a group of thugs with baseball bats, and though no one was injured, he left with empty pockets and an incentive to find work.

The penniless backpacker saw an ad for a chef de partie at La Bouchee in South Kensington. "I was like, 'Ah, I've worked in kitchens'. Except no. No I hadn't. Not at any level. I walked in there and they gave me the job straight away. What I didn't know is that it was a massively violent all-French kitchen. So they were obviously turning over heaps of staff. But that was fine."

From there, he had a brief stint at the Ambassador Court Hotel in High Wycombe, a place that sounds as if even the kitchens would have carpets, but which he describes as horrendous. "But it was live-in. And I didn't have any money."

It was then Welgemoed got serious, working at a clutch of England's Michelin-starred restaurants including the Goose in Britwell Salome and Raymond Blanc's Le Manoir aux Quat'Saisons. Interesting side note: though he and Firedoor's Lennox Hastie both spent some serious time at Le Manoir, they never crossed paths. "We were actually standing side by side at an event, and I was thinking, 'Where the f--- do I know you from?' I reckon I took over the fish station from him when he left."

A young Duncan Welgemoed, far left, with workmates at the Goose in Britwell Salome.

From Le Manoir, Welgemoed moved to the Fat Duck in Bray as the larder chef, which he hated. "It was a realisation of what I didn't want to do. It was just not my style. Coming from pan work especially, and then going into a kitchen which was all f---ing sous-vide cookery, everything apart from garnish was timer, timer, timer."

Sick of the prescriptive, hands-off work he was doing at the Duck, he returned to the pans at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay in London. More importantly, just after leaving Ramsay, Welgemoed fell for an Australian girl. The pair married in Adelaide, and on discovering she was pregnant, decided to stay and raise their family in South Australia. Seeing the country for the first time was visceral for the chef, who'd spent his entire adult life to date in English kitchens. "Coming from England to a place like Adelaide in the summer . it's f---ing magical. You've got the hills, beautiful wines, the beach. And everything's within 20 minutes of each other."

He also recognised an area he could reinvigorate. The culinary scene, post-'80s boom, had suffered a bit of brewer's droop. "It was pretty f---ing harrowing. [Influential Malaysian-born chef] Cheong Liew was no longer at The Grange, there were a couple of good regionals but nothing spectacular – not from the level of cookery I was used to in the UK. It wasn't like you'd drive 15 minutes away and there'd be a Michelin restaurant. Here, it was like, 'Ugh. Average.' There was a massive brain drain in terms of talent so I thought, 'Actually, I could do something here'."

So Welgemoed threw everything he'd learned about French cooking into Bistro Dom, which he ran until 2014. Late that year, he opened Africola, a restaurant that spoke to his history, his homeland, his taste. Reflective, reflexive, spicy, loud.

"I limit myself pretty hard at Africola. It has to be African-inspired. And it's good to have a really strong narrative. With Southern African cooking, for instance, the palate is very harsh, it's very direct. It's sour, hot, salty, sweet. There's no subtlety, really. I think my food's pretty tasty. And I always try to find that kind of balance. But flavour is first and foremost for me."

There's certainly an "all flair don't care" attitude here. But the brashness is for show. Behind the scenes, Welgemoed says, they're watching everything.

"I love watching the room, and I run the restaurant from the pass, because I plan the menu around each particular customer when I'm cooking, which is great because everyone gets something different. I might not send out shots for the 64-year-old table of two but I can see the young couple – the guy's definitely a chef, I don't know where from, he might be just a starting chef from the way he's dressed or the way he's eating. And then you can immediately turn them on. There's a lot of psychology when it comes to running a restaurant like that."

Quickfire corner

Music to cook to: Add Violence by Nine Inch Nails

After-midnight snack: Tuna mayo sandwich

Kitchen weapon at work: My head chef, Imogen Czulowski

Formative cookbook: The Mirabelle Cookbook, Marco Pierre White


HGTV's My Lottery Dream Home isn't the first show David Bromstad has hosted

David Bromstad's path to hosting HGTV's My Lottery Dream Home was far from typical. As the network's longtime viewers will recall, Bromstad first came to HGTV as a contestant on the first season of Design Star in 2006, competing against other hopefuls for the opportunity to host an HGTV show. Bromstad was the show's first-ever winner, which led him to be hired to host HGTV's Color Splash.

As Bromstad's IMDb page details, that gig led to more hosting jobs with HGTV. Next up were a couple of specials, HGTV Dream Home 2007 and The Ultimate Color Guide, along with an appearance on HGTV Showdown. Then he was tapped to host the short-lived Bang For Your Buck, which ran for just one season, before hosting HGTV miniseries Beach Flip.

When the opportunity arose to host My Lottery Dream Home, Bromstad had become a seasoned HGTV veteran with several years of experience in front of the camera. "Whenever people call me a star, I think it's weird," Bromstad admitted in an interview with HGTV. "I go, 'No, I'm just a person with a cool job.'"


Team That Arrived With Little Finds Plenty of Generosity for Its Cup Bid

CHESTER, Pa. — Skill and perseverance seemed to have overcome a lack of preparation and money. Trinidad and Tobago positioned itself to become the first Caribbean nation to qualify for the Women’s World Cup. A goal scored late in regulation Sunday left players jubilantly running and jumping at PPL Park.

Only one problem: This was the 78th minute of a soccer game scheduled for at least 90.

At its most potent, Trinidad and Tobago was also at its most vulnerable. Fifty-five seconds later, Mexico tied the score on a powerful header and won, 4-2 in overtime, when Veronica Charlyn Corral delivered decisive goals in the 104th and 106th minutes.

Mexico, as the third-place finisher in Concacaf — the North American, Central American and Caribbean region — qualified for the 2015 Women’s World Cup in Canada, where the field will expand to 24 teams, from 16.

The United States and Costa Rica had already qualified before the Americans defeated the Ticas, 6-0, in Sunday’s championship match on four goals and an assist by Abby Wambach.

Trinidad and Tobago, inexperienced and exhausted after twice playing 30 minutes of overtime in 48 hours, now faces a home-and-away playoff against Ecuador, the third-place finisher from South America. An arduous and elusive journey toward the World Cup continues.

Little time was afforded the Soca Princesses for training before this tournament. Their conditioning lagged. On Oct. 8, shortly after the players arrived for their final preparations in Dallas, Coach Randy Waldrum sent out a financial S.O.S. on Twitter.

“I need HELP!” wrote Waldrum, who works without a salary. “T&T sent a team here last night with $500 total. No equipment such as balls, no transportation from airport to hotel, nothing.”

Waldrum, an American who coached Notre Dame to two women’s N.C.A.A. titles and now coaches the Houston Dash of the National Women’s Soccer League, continued: “I have to help these players somehow. They deserve better.”

Help arrived quickly in terms of donations from a number of benefactors. Trinidad and Tobago’s story illustrates the generosity extended by many in the international soccer community. And, less encouragingly, it demonstrates that the treatment of women’s soccer lags far behind men’s soccer in a vast majority of nations.

“When you look at the U.S. women, you see how far we’ve come, and when you look at Trinidad and Tobago’s team, you see how far we have to go,” said Jen Cooper of Houston, who operates the website KeeperNotes.com, which has raised $17,000 in donations for the Soca Princesses.

The soccer federation of Trinidad and Tobago has long been mired in scandal and debt. Its disgraced former leader, Jack Warner, resigned in 2011 amid a bribery scandal as vice president of FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, and as president of Concacaf, the regional governing body.

Attempts at reform in the Caribbean country’s soccer federation have not always gone smoothly. The lack of funding for the women’s team became a public embarrassment. Raymond Tim Kee, the current president of the federation, accused Waldrum of an “emotional disturbance,” according to news accounts.

An apology written in Waldrum’s name, but apparently not by him, said that his appeal for financial assistance “was not meant to cause any embarrassment” to Trinidad and Tobago soccer officials or the public.

Calculated or not, Waldrum’s public appeal worked. The team received donations from as far away as Poland and Singapore. Sports officials in Trinidad and Tobago pledged $40,000 to the team and bonuses of about $8,000 to each player if the Soca Princesses reach the World Cup, Waldrum said.

Upon arriving at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport in early October, players worked a deal with cabdrivers to get them to their hotel. Waldrum then sent out his Twitter plea. Within eight hours, Cooper raised $9,500 through her website.

Haiti, another women’s team in need, donated $658, half of what it had in its bank account. (The money was later refunded, Cooper said.) The United States soccer federation and N.W.S.L. sent a check for $500. The Canadian soccer federation donated cold-weather gear. F.C. Dallas of Major League Soccer provided a training facility, proceeds from a women’s exhibition and meals.

Members of a soccer supporters group, the American Outlaws, from Dallas and Fort Worth, loaded three vehicles with water, bananas, sports drinks and snacks. A soccer store in suburban Dallas donated cleats to players with worn-out footwear.

“When one of us is in need, all of us are in need in the soccer community,” said Dana Crane, a member of the American Outlaws from Fort Worth who traveled here on vacation time to support Trinidad and Tobago. “We do what we can to help.”

Waldrum called the outpouring of support “amazing” and said, “I think we won a lot of hearts with this.”

Once the qualifying tournament began Oct. 15, Concacaf picked up the housing and travel costs for the eight participating teams. Twice this weekend, Trinidad and Tobago had chances to reach its first Women’s World Cup and came up just short.

In Friday’s semifinals, the Soca Princesses lost a penalty shootout to Costa Rica. On Sunday, Mariah Shade put Trinidad and Tobago up, 2-1, in the 78th minute. Less than a minute later, Mexico’s Monica Ocampo tied the score with a forceful header, sending the game toward overtime.

Waldrum’s players, physically spent, crumbled in added time. Now the Soca Princesses must travel Nov. 8 to Quito, Ecuador’s capital, about 9,300 feet above sea level. Mexico has offered Trinidad and Tobago a training facility in Mexico City, at an altitude of about 7,200 feet. The return leg, according to FIFA, will be played in Trinidad and Tobago on Dec 2.

“I think we can do a lot with this team if we can get the resources and the funding and the things we need to train them properly,” Waldrum said.


Watch the video: 2017 Summer Fancy Food Show Sizzle Reel (January 2022).